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Seven Campfire Setups for Summer

Most Campers fall into one of three categories:
1) If you’re an experienced backpacker or camper, you will know that fires come in all shapes and size, but sometimes it can be hard to decide which type of fire you’ll need for a specific situation.
2) If you are a semi-frequent flier in the woods, then you probably have a certain fire that you are really good at building,and it has become your default.
3) If you are the last type of camper, where you go out when dragged bringing your glamping set up with you – you haven’t ever made your own campfire.
Whether you’re looking to hone your decisive skills, add to your camping repetition, or learn how to light your first, we are here for you!
Teepee fire

1. Teepee Fire

This is great fire to start with when you’re ready to climb the ladder of  campfire complexity. The Teepee fire is fast burning,  and puts out a lot of heat and light, fast burning. These teepee fires are made for summer nights of sitting under the stars.

 

Swedish Torch fire

 

2. Swedish Torch

More common in the winter months, the Swedish torch is a popular choice for conserving resources. It uses little fuel, but it only produces a little heat and a little light. This doesn’t pose much of a problem in the summer heat, but this is certainly  a viable option for a long-standing flame. The Swedish Torch is also a good idea if you have a cast iron pan or kettle, because the top of the torch serves as a rack.

3. Criss-Cross Fire

While we’re talking good for cooking, we have to mention the criss-cross fire. This fire lasts longer than the teepee fire, and puts out a lot of steady heat. This is what makes the criss-cross such a reliable source for cooking.

keyhole fire

4. Keyhole firepit

The Keyhole firepit combines the ideas of the teepee and criss-cross fires for optimal cooking. The grill grate is placed over charcoal or wood coals at the bottom of the “keyhole” to add a delicious smoky campfirey flavor.

5. Gypsy fire

A gypsy fire is what you think of when you think of cowboys and and railroad drifters in movies. A gypsy fire is when your pot that hangs from over a simple fire. This particular fire is great for boiling water for purification, and putting together soups and stews.
trench fire

6. Trench Fire

You might think that a fire on a windy night is challenging, however, trench fires are easy to build, and are self-perpetuating. They use varying depths of ground to manipulate the wind for your benefit. When building this fire, you should face the shallow end of the hole you’ve dug towards the wind- this will fuel it to burn very hot as the wind is going into the blow into the fire.

7. Finnish Gap fire

This fire is made for all night warmth for those unexpectedly chilly nights after those long, hot summer days. If you get caught without enough gear on a chilly enough night, and a finnish gap fire will be your best friend.
All of these fires are excellent in their own way, and can all be used no matter what your level your campfire-expertise might be. While all great options, you’ll need to ensure dry building materials. Just in case of rain, or damp conditions, it would be wise to pack fire-starters.
Let us know your favorite fire combinations for the summer months!
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